1. Re: twitter [excerpt from Autophagiogrpahy] →

    torpekonyvek:

    Re: twitter
    I want to empty the ocean of contents in which we are
    making waves, to paddle in nothingness
    To cling only to the discontinuity between you and I
    and make the world jolt in thinking our miserable
    contradiction
    This trick I play on the world to make it drop me in its
    terminal amnesia,

  2. So, Accelerationism, what's all that about? →

    deontologistics:

    So, accelerationism, what’s all that about? Well, lots of people are talking about it, and lots of them are very critical of it. As someone who has played a small role in the development of what is increasingly being called ‘left-accelerationist’ thought (I organised the second accelerationist…

  3. actionbookspress:

‘You’re faking it. That’s just a copy’ 
Laura Ellen Joyce writes, "Sara Tuss Efrik’s Persona Peep Show is a reproduction that draws attention to its status as perverse copy – as defaced art. The poem-film examines what it means to reproduce. There is a heavy emphasis on the female body in the language and visual imagery of the piece. What we are seeing in this film is both a reproduction of Bergman’s Persona, and an interrogation of the ways in which reproduction happens culturally, artistically, and biologically. Efrik reminds us that reproduction is an uncanny act, that to reproduce is always to die. Reproduction exists as a means to protect the dwindling, fragile object which is replaced. In the case of Persona Peep Show, Efrik resituates Bergman’s original film within a contemporary political and artistic context and allows it to be disseminated anew. What she also does is to set up a series of psychoanalytic and feminist concerns around the nature of reproduction.”[Click] to continue reading

    actionbookspress:

    ‘You’re faking it. That’s just a copy’

    Laura Ellen Joyce writes, "Sara Tuss Efrik’s Persona Peep Show is a reproduction that draws attention to its status as perverse copy – as defaced art. The poem-film examines what it means to reproduce. There is a heavy emphasis on the female body in the language and visual imagery of the piece. What we are seeing in this film is both a reproduction of Bergman’s Persona, and an interrogation of the ways in which reproduction happens culturally, artistically, and biologically. Efrik reminds us that reproduction is an uncanny act, that to reproduce is always to die. Reproduction exists as a means to protect the dwindling, fragile object which is replaced. In the case of Persona Peep Show, Efrik resituates Bergman’s original film within a contemporary political and artistic context and allows it to be disseminated anew. What she also does is to set up a series of psychoanalytic and feminist concerns around the nature of reproduction.”

    [Click] to continue reading

  4. Now available for pre-order: Danielle Pafunda's 'When You Left Me in the Rutted Terrain of Our Love at the Border, which I Could Not Cross, Remaining a Citizen of This Corrupt Land' →

    birdsoflace:

    Pre-orders come with a limited edition letterpress broadside AND letterpress coaster featuring text from the chapbook!

  5. Worms won’t live in you, but they slum there for kicks. I catch you licking the tines of a rake from which dangle dead leaves, used condoms, fast food wrappers, and loose clumps of earth. I feed you cigars for snack time and play YouTube videos of middle-class couples smearing themselves in yogurt and honey, local honey. I’ve seen you wave your pun-vessel at passers-by on the busiest street corner in the neighborhood. You carry an unweaned kitten whom you won’t let drink her mama’s milk until you’ve had your fill. It’s embarrassing to be caught in the range of your pheromones, a special mix of bandage and spittle. You grow mushrooms in a wet paper sack to cover the smell of your molting ideas.

    — Danielle Pafunda, from her forthcoming BoL chapbook When You Left Me in the Rutted Terrain of Our Love at the Border, which I Could Not Cross, Remaining a Citizen of This Corrupt Land, which you can pre-order here! (via birdsoflace)

  6. actionbookspress:

Joyelle writes, “In his post yesterday, Johannes made an interesting observation in passing on the Thai setting of Nicholas Winding Refn’s widely reviled Only God Forgives:

Like Sylvia Plath’s “Fever 103″ it takes place in the orient, where imperialism discovered modern beauty in the 18th and 19th centuries. In Xanadu, Coleridge built an opium den…

One of the film’s obscenities is the obscenely patent Orientalism of Refn’s mise-en-scene. The film unfolds in a claustrophobic Bangkok-as-‘Chinatown’ , on sets reminiscent of The Lady From Shanghai, Death of a Chinese Bookie, and Polanski’s iconic so-named film in which Chinatown stands in for Hollywood’s Heart of Darkness, complete with reddish-green lights, drug haze, voyeuristic, curtained chambers, catwalks and corridors, sightlines which don’t match up, and theatrical spaces like operas, burlesque stages, go-go cages, boxing rings and nightclubs. The obscene is that which should remain hidden but is not; in Refn’s film, the latent racism of Orientalist tropes so common in Western film is right out there into the open, neither ironized nor dressed up as Keanu-ish spiritualism for the benefit of the Western individual’s soul.”[Click] to continue reading

    actionbookspress:

    Joyelle writes, “In his post yesterday, Johannes made an interesting observation in passing on the Thai setting of Nicholas Winding Refn’s widely reviled Only God Forgives:

    Like Sylvia Plath’s “Fever 103″ it takes place in the orient, where imperialism discovered modern beauty in the 18th and 19th centuries. In Xanadu, Coleridge built an opium den…

    One of the film’s obscenities is the obscenely patent Orientalism of Refn’s mise-en-scene. The film unfolds in a claustrophobic Bangkok-as-‘Chinatown’ , on sets reminiscent of The Lady From Shanghai, Death of a Chinese Bookie, and Polanski’s iconic so-named film in which Chinatown stands in for Hollywood’s Heart of Darkness, complete with reddish-green lights, drug haze, voyeuristic, curtained chambers, catwalks and corridors, sightlines which don’t match up, and theatrical spaces like operas, burlesque stages, go-go cages, boxing rings and nightclubs. The obscene is that which should remain hidden but is not; in Refn’s film, the latent racism of Orientalist tropes so common in Western film is right out there into the open, neither ironized nor dressed up as Keanu-ish spiritualism for the benefit of the Western individual’s soul.”


    [Click] to continue reading

  7. actionbookspress:

I UNDERSTAND AND I WISH TO CONTINUELucas de Lima in person! Reading + Q&A. Admission free. Join us at FLAT Space May 23rd for an evening with author Lucas De Lima. Lucas will be reading from his newly published book Wet Land out on Action Books. This reading will take place in the gallery space as part of the exhibition run of Perverted Living. As if this exploration of Queer Latino/Latina identity is not enough for you Lucas will be reading works by Roberto Piva, Hiromi Ito and Lara Glenum. The evening will also contain a short screening of experimental moving image works curated by Daniel Luedtke. More info to come!"These poems lurch from the murky waters of our collective unconscious and side-swipe us with a lyric invocation of the dark forces of… what? Nature? History? The alien life-force that drives planetary evolution? A primal being raises itself from the swamp of human consciousness, animated by the archaic and archetypal Sobek, the Egyptian god in crocodile form. The two voices that alternate in this narrative of trauma—the quotidian voice of the poet and a ritual voice of invocation—queer the story in the most profound way. Together with de Lima we call forth the god who will transform the narrative. As queers, we are the incarnation of countless shamans, medicine men, magicians and priests. The poet places himself in this tradition through his invocation."—AA BronsonLucas de Lima was born in southeastern Brazil. He is the author of Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) as well as the chapbooks Ghostlines (Radioactive Moat) and Terraputa (forthcoming from Birds of Lace). A contributing writer at Montevidayo, he pursues doctoral studies in Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.[Click] for the Facebook link

    actionbookspress:

    I UNDERSTAND AND I WISH TO CONTINUE

    Lucas de Lima in person! Reading + Q&A.
    Admission free.

    Join us at FLAT Space May 23rd for an evening with author Lucas De Lima. Lucas will be reading from his newly published book Wet Land out on Action Books. This reading will take place in the gallery space as part of the exhibition run of Perverted Living.

    As if this exploration of Queer Latino/Latina identity is not enough for you Lucas will be reading works by Roberto Piva, Hiromi Ito and Lara Glenum.

    The evening will also contain a short screening of experimental moving image works curated by Daniel Luedtke. More info to come!

    "These poems lurch from the murky waters of our collective unconscious and side-swipe us with a lyric invocation of the dark forces of… what? Nature? History? The alien life-force that drives planetary evolution? A primal being raises itself from the swamp of human consciousness, animated by the archaic and archetypal Sobek, the Egyptian god in crocodile form. The two voices that alternate in this narrative of trauma—the quotidian voice of the poet and a ritual voice of invocation—queer the story in the most profound way. Together with de Lima we call forth the god who will transform the narrative. As queers, we are the incarnation of countless shamans, medicine men, magicians and priests. The poet places himself in this tradition through his invocation."
    —AA Bronson

    Lucas de Lima was born in southeastern Brazil. He is the author of Wet Land (Action Books, 2014) as well as the chapbooks Ghostlines (Radioactive Moat) and Terraputa (forthcoming from Birds of Lace). A contributing writer at Montevidayo, he pursues doctoral studies in Comparative Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.

    [Click] for the Facebook link

  8. nagaxpressdwhitewillowzz21:

    boosthouse:

    cassandragillig:

    juliana spahr & joshua clover wrote the best thing i have ever read

    meditations on frustration

    i will happily second cassadra gillig’s rating of this poem. it has stayed with me since i read it and i cannot wait to read it again but now that i know what is in it i want to be ready for it. dear reader, you should just go ahead and read it like now

  9. 25 June 2014

    62 notes

    Reblogged from
    p-dpa

    p-dpa:

    ISBN 0-9548366-7-7, Fiona Banner (2009)

    The tattoo is my own personal ISBN (International Standard Book Number); I am officially registered as a publication – ‘Fiona Banner’. It’s not really about branding, but how works of art act as mirrors; it’s also about stories and biography – the conspiracy of narrative. It was thinking also about copyright and publishing in a jokey, serious way. A sort of portrait as book.

  10. 25 June 2014

    4 notes

    Reblogged from
    pennyante

    pennyante:

#mashatupitsyn Love Dog, p124

    pennyante:

    #mashatupitsyn Love Dog, p124

  11. htmlgiant:

How do you write a thrilling and entrancing Alt Lit novel?
Start with a chorus of disembodied voices telling us that “the waves are helloes; the incoming storm the sincerest goodbye. Like every single one of us, they are holding on. We held on until we could no longer hide. No one can hide out at sea.”
Read More

    htmlgiant:

    How do you write a thrilling and entrancing Alt Lit novel?

    Start with a chorus of disembodied voices telling us that “the waves are helloes; the incoming storm the sincerest goodbye. Like every single one of us, they are holding on. We held on until we could no longer hide. No one can hide out at sea.”

    Read More

  12. Whose Future? →

    strangesubject:

    image

    Written by Quinn Lester, Reviewed by Y. F. Wang

    "But which is the revolutionary path? Is there one? – To withdraw from the world market, as Samir Amin advises Third World Countries to do, in a curious revival of the fascist ‘economic solution’? Or might it be to go in the opposite…